Enjoy the cool weather while it is here!

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Substantial tomato harvest with a kohlrabi

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Harvest from the collaborative garden with The Dome Restaurant and the culinary dept. at Coral Gables Senior High.

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Cabbage – “Savoy”

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“Purple Cherokee” tomatoes that will ripen soon

There is a window of cool weather left for more planting and lots of harvesting of cool weather vegetables and herbs in Miami and South Florida area.  Enjoy it while we have it, because soon the focus of people gardening will be growing tropical fruit trees and heat-tolerant vegetables and herbs.

We’ve posted below some of our favorite close-ups of our spring’s abundance.

Feel free to email photos of your garden and harvest to dylan@miamiediblegardens.com or post them on our facebook page.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Tatsoi with Red Komatsuna

 

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Endive – “Frisee”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Cauliflower – “Romanesco”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Red Komatsuna

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Dinosaur Kale with other brassicas

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Cauliflower – “Purple Graffiti”

 

 

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Garden to Table: As local as food gets

IMG_4794Though the “garden to table” concept isn’t new, it is one recently introduced to the arena of South Florida restaurants.  If managed properly, a restaurant having its own garden on-site can have many positive benefits, including:

  • The freshest produce possible.  Having the garden a few steps away enables the restaurant to harvest on its own schedule, as needed.
  • Reduced storage needs.  By having a garden so close, there is a reduced need to refrigerate produce for days or weeks in addition to less waste. Continue reading
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Cool-weather veggies and herbs ready for planting!

 

Fall is now here and we have been preparing intensely for a great planting season with the construction of new hoophouses and planting a great selection of veggies and herbs from seed or cutting.  If you’d like to purchase any for your garden, let us know.  Also, if you’d like help replanting your garden or would like to schedule an installation, the sooner you let us know the better!  Seedlings will be for sale this Saturday October 6th at Miami Beach Botanical Garden and October 20th and 21st at Fairchild Tropical Garden’s Edible Garden Festival.  Our current fall plant selection is as follows:

 

Veggies:

 

 

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Ready for Fall Planting?

The cooler weather is just around the corner.  Pretty soon, starting mid to late September it will be time for fall planting of cool weather crops.  Remember to check on the condition of your soil and add compost and/or organic fertilizer as needed.  We also recommend to usually mulch around plants after planting to inhibit the growth of weeds and to conserve moisture in the soil.

If you are growing your own seedlings we recommend starting most of them in a location protected from hard rain with filtered light.  Larger seeds are an exception (beans, cucumber, etc) and should be planted directly in the garden.

If anyone would like help with planting for fall, remember that Ready-to-Grow Gardens has a lot to offer.  This includes veggie and herb starter plants, compost, mulch, organic fertilizer in addition to the services of installing or replanting edible gardens for fall.  We are also available to answer questions anyone has and give our advice on all matters involving growing vegetables, fruit and herbs in South Florida.

For more information or to schedule an appointment email dylan@miamiediblegardens.com or call 786-436-7703.

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Plant tropical fruits & vegetables before it is too late!

Remember this hot and steamy part of the year is the best time for planting tropical fruits and vegetables. Once the cool weather sets in, it won’t be as optimal for planting them.

If any of you need help with ideas of how to start growing a wide variety of tropical fruits and vegetables, check out our food forest packages.

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Ready-to-Grow Gardens lecturing at Flamingo Gardens this Saturday

This Saturday, August 18, 1-3pm Dylan Terry and Chris French of Ready-to-Grow Gardens will be giving the class Growing Food All Year in South Florida at Flamingo Gardens in Davie. The class will include a discussion of design, installation and maintenance of sustainable edible landscaping in South Florida.

Other topics include:

  • Best vegetables, herbs and fruits for South Florida’s climate*
  • When and where to plant
  • Soil building
  • rainwater harvesting and irrigation
  • Organic pest management and more!

* Plants will be available to purchase

 

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Planning, installing and maintaining your edible garden

Planning an edible garden:

Many gardeners jump right into gardening without a clear plan for their garden.  This can be ok for some, and beginner’s luck is a phenomenon that exists in certain gardening situations, but by and large it is helpful to generate some sort of plan, even if it isn’t a plan executed at once.  Developing the right plan for your edible garden depends on the amount of space (soil, sun exposure, proximity to kitchen, etc) and the amount of work that you want to invest into its installation and maintenance.

Summer is an excellent time to improve your soil and have it ready for fall planting.  I recommend doing this by adding compost, mulch and planting cover crops like buckwheat, sunn hemp and pigeon pea.  Also, summer is the best time to plant fruit trees, so if you want to include fruit trees in your edible landscape consider planting them while we have the rain and warmth of our summer weather.

Consider having a your bed(s) for annual vegetables and herbs in an area close to your kitchen door, or for Continue reading

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New Edible South Florida Issue is out!

Check out the new issue of Edible South Florida by clicking here or on the cover.  Paper copies can be found at Whole Foods.  On page 16 of the online viewer one can find my column, “Edible Garden Q & A”.

 

 

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Yard Long Bean, the ultimate green bean for your South Florida summer veggie garden

Yard Long Bean

Vegetable gardens in Miami and the greater South Florida area just aren’t quite the same without Yard Long Bean.  If given a tall trellis and ample sunlight, it is difficult to not get an abundant harvest of these, which taste very similar to the common “green bean”.  As with most beans and large-seeded veggies one will have best results when seeded directly in the garden rather than transplanting.  More information can be seen here and seeds can be ordered from  Eden Organic Nursery Services…. Just remember to pick them young or they might not be palatable if too old.

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Food Forest Packages Available, Ready-to-Grow!

Food Forests” are food-producing systems that mimic the look and function of nature.  In many ways, they look like natural forests, with trees, vines, shrubs and groundcovers of varying shapes and sizes.  Like in natural forests, you find both annuals and perrenials.  However, foods forests are different than other forests in that their main role is to produce food.

Avocado, key lime, papaya, dragonfruit, sweet potato, Jamaican dandelion, Ethiopian kale, sunn hemp & more

In food forests, the majority of all the plants planted are edible in some way to us.  One can find a wide array of fruits, nuts, leafy greens, herbs, and root vegetables, all with the potential to feed. Other plants also planted in food forests may not be edible to us, but are beneficial to promoting wildlife (including pollinators and pest eaters), or are primarily planted to improve the soil (like nitrogen fixers and dynamic accumulators).

This can be a very efficient way to produce a lot of food in a more ecologically sensitive manner.  Also, since food forests are usually composed of mostly perennials, they are relatively low-maintenance once established.  The main work required is harvesting.

Food forest with banana, papaya, mulberry, yuca, and sunn hemp along with beds for annuals and herbs. Also there is guava, carambola, dragonfruit, fig, lemon and sugar apple but there aren't too visible in this pic.


 

Small food forest with bananas, guava, chaya, sweet potato, ginger, cranberry hibiscus, calalu, cuban oregano, sunn hemp, etc.

A food forest doesn’t need to be very large, though it can be. Food forests can just be a small part of a yard. Let us know if you would like help starting one.


Designs are often custom, but we also have some existing packages to choose from,  as seen below.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mini Food Forest – $250 – 2 papaya, 1 banana, 1 cranberry hibiscus, 1 katuk, 1 sweet potato, 1 comfrey, pigeon pea, sunn hemp, buckwheat.  Planting includes 1/2 yard of compost, 1/2 yard of mulch, and organic fertilizer.

Small Food Forest – $500 – 2 medium-growing fruit trees, 2 papaya, 1 banana, 1 ginger, 2 cranberry hibiscus, 1 katuk, 2 sweet potatoes, 2 comfrey, pigeon pea, sunn hemp, buckwheat, and 15 other veggies/herbs.  Planting includes 1 yard of compost, 1 yard of mulch, and organic fertilizer.

Medium Food Forest- $1000 – 2 large-growing fruit trees, 4 medium-growing fruit trees, 3 papaya, 2 banana, 1 passionfruit or dragonfruit, 2 ginger, 4 cranberry hibiscus, 2 katuk, 4 sweet potatoes, 4 comfrey, 1 mexican sunflower, pigeon pea, sunn hemp, buckwheat, and 30 other veggies/herbs.  Planting includes 2 yards of compost, 2 yards of mulch, and organic fertilizer.

Large Food Forest- $2000 – 5 large-growing fruit trees, 10 medium-growing fruit trees, 6 papaya, 4 banana, 1 passionfruit, 1 dragon fruit, 4 ginger, 8 cranberry hibiscus, 4 katuk, 8 sweet potato, 6 comfrey, 2 mexican sunflower, 1 moringa, pigeon pea, sunn hemp, buckwheat, and 60 other veggies/herbs. Planting includes 4 yards of compost, 4 yards of mulch, and organic fertilizer.

Very small "guerilla" food forest with basket vine, katuk, galanga, papaya, along with a variety of annuals and herbs

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